Loading...
 

Welcome

日本語のページはこちらです。
We are organizing an international conference on “The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World.” It will take place the week of July 20-25, right after the World Congress of the International Sociological Association (ISA), first in the exciting capital of Tokyo (July 20-22) and then in the beautiful traditional city of Kyoto (July 23-25). The University of Tokyo and Kyoto University will sponsor the event. In the conference, we plan to compare the goals, strategies, and trajectories of movements around the world that challenge the neoliberal global order or have been shaped by it. We hope to examine these movements’ potential and limitations, and to explore their implications for the future of democracy.

There are fifteen workshop sessions and a symposium in this conference. In the small-group workshop session, a presenter will distribute his/her research paper in advance, participants will read the paper in advance of the session, and on the day of the workshop, most of the time will be devoted to discussion of the paper. We choose this workshop format so that world-renowned scholars, young researchers, and energetic graduate students from around the world can engage ideas in a free atmosphere and can nurture relationships that may serve as the a basis for global academic collaboration in the future. In the symposium, three prominent scholars will give lectures at the Ito Hall, the University of Tokyo. This event will be open to the public. To facilitate communication between the lecturers and audiences, a reception at the Event Space will follow.

For our conference themes, click here.
For the list of the conference participants, click here.
To attend the workshops and/or symposiums, click here.
For our Japanese homepage, click here.


Program

The program is subject to change. Please visit this page periodically for updates (last updated on July 14).

Preliminary Sessions


July 2 (Wednesday)

Graduate Seminar: Takeshi Wada

Date July 2, Wednesday
Time 14:50-18:00
Event GRADUATE SEMINAR
"The Future of Democracy after Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World"
Instructor Takeshi Wada (The University of Tokyo)
Readings Session #13
(1) Garretón M., Manuel Antonio. 2009. "Changes in the sociopolitical matrix and development in Chile." Diplomacy, Strategy & Politics 9:43-68.
(2) Tamayo, Sergio 2010. “Dynamic of contention: post-electoral movement in Mexico.” In SinghaRoy, Debal ed. Dissenting voices and transformative actions: social movements in a globalizing world. New Delhi: Manohar Publishers. 419-433.
(3) Heller, Patrick. 2014. "Development in the city: growth and inclusion in India, Brazil and South Africa (draft, do not cite or quote without permission)." In State building in the developing world, edited by M. Centeno, D. Yashar, and A. Kohli.
(4) Evans, Peter. 2011. "Rethinking neo-Polanyian optimism: transnational politics after the decline of neoliberalism (A post-script to Is an alternative globalization possible?) (draft, do not cite, quote or circulate)." Pp. 1-8.
Syllabus Click here to download the syllabus.(external link)
Language English
Venue Building #8, Room 8-113
The University of Tokyo, Komaba Campus
(external link)


July 7 (Monday) - July 28 (Monday)

Graduate Seminar: Moises Arce

Date/Time
Room
July 7 (Monday) 2nd & 3rd periods: Room 8-420
July 8 (Tuesday) 2nd & 3rd periods: Room 8-210
July 9 (Wednesday) 2nd, 3rd, 5th & 6th periods: Room 8-420
July 16 (Wednesday) 2nd & 3rd periods: Room 8-420
July 28 (Monday) 2nd & 3rd periods: Room 8-420
Course INTENSIVE GRADUATE SEMINAR
"Contentious Politics in the Andean Region"
Instructor Moises Arce (The University of Tokyo & University of Missouri, Columbia)
Course Description

Image Two broad waves of protests within a larger cycle of mobilization against economic liberalization can be seen in the Andean region. The first wave corresponds to the protests against the economic austerity measures of the 1980s. These austerity policies primarily sought to restore macroeconomic discipline. The second wave follows the deepening of economic liberalization policies starting in the late 1990s as seen in the protests against the privatization of utility services, and the mobilizations against the expansion of the extractive economy as a consequence of growing volumes of foreign and domestic investments in the natural resource sector.
The seminar will reflect on the causes and consequences of social mobilizations, examining how economic liberalization policies encouraged protest movements, and how political democracy, in turn, shaped societal responses to economic liberalization policies.
The seminar will study and compare the dynamics of protest movements in the Andean countries of Peru, Ecuador and Bolivia. It will introduce students to key scholarly works on protest movements, economic liberalization and democracy in the Andes.
Schedule Part I: Social Mobilization: Explanations, Concepts and Approaches
Part II: Waves of Protests against Economic Liberalization in the Andes
Part III: The Consequences of Mobilizations on Democracy in the Andes
Keywords Protest, Democracy, Economic Liberalization, Andean Region
Syllabus Not available.
Language English
Venue Room 8-420 or 8-210 (see above)
The University of Tokyo, Komaba Campus
(external link)


July 10 (Thursday)

Pre-Opening Seminar: Michael Burawoy

Date July 10, Thursday
Time 16:30-18:30
Event

PRE-OPENING SEMINAR
Michael Burawoy (University of California, Berkeley)
The President of the International Sociological Association

Manufacturing Consent Revisited: Reflections on 40 Years of Labor Studies.


Michael Burawoy will examine the flaws in the book Manufacturing Consent and what this says about theory, about methodology as well as about the changes in capitalism over the last 40 years.

Image Image
Paper Click here to read the paper(external link) (available now!).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free (No prior registration is necessary).
Venue Auditorium (3rd floor, Administration Office Building.)(external link)
The University of Tokyo, Komaba Campus(external link)
Sponsor Image
JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

Image
Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image
Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)



Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Conference, The University of Tokyo

  Image Image


July 20 (Sunday)

Workshop #1: Eli Friedman

Date July 20, Sunday
Time 09:00-10:20
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Eli Friedman (Cornell University)
"Alienated Politics: Labor Insurgency and the Paternalistic State in China."


Image
Discussants Kim Voss (University of California, Berkeley)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Conference Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #2: Gay Seidman

Date July 20, Sunday
Time 10:40-12:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Gay Seidman (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
"The Crisis in COSATU: What democratic South Africa’s labor conflicts might tell us about globalization, unions, and social protest."


Image Labor activists around the world have viewed South Africa’s militant unionism as a model of ‘social movement unionism’, but today – twenty years after Mandela’s election – the labor movement is in crisis, weakened both politically and on the shopfloor, despite persistent and ongoing militance. In this paper, I look at how democratization, globalization, and a changing union membership have redefined the relationships between unions, employers, the state, and South Africa’s workers. As poor communities have increasingly turned to state-centered ‘service delivery protests’, South Africa’s labor unions face difficult new challenges about how best to strengthen social inclusion and expanded labor rights.
Discussants Rina Agarwala (John Hopkins University)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Conference Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Symposium
Speaker #1: Partha Chatterjee
Speaker #2: Patricia Steinhoff
Speaker #3: Peter Evans

Date July 20, Sunday
Time 13:30-18:00
Event SYMPOSIUM: The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World
Image

Keynote Speakers (subject to change):

1) Partha Chatterjee (Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta & Columbia University)

2) Patricia Steinhoff (University of Hawaii)

3) Peter Evans (University of California, Berkeley & Brown University)

There is a reception party following the symposium (see below for the details).
Keynote Speaker #1 Partha Chatterjee
"Postcolonial Democracy and the Political Management of Primitive Accumulation."

Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).

Image


Abstract:

With setbacks in Thailand and Egypt, the present prospects of democracy in the postcolonial world seem somewhat discouraging. But one must remember that capitalist growth is taking place in most of these countries under conditions that are unprecedented in modern history. The key concept here is that of the primitive accumulation of capital by which primary producers are separated from their means of production to become available as wage labourers. Primitive accumulation was politically managed in 18th and 19th century Europe through the mediation of the state before the age of mass democracy. The dispossessed population that could not be absorbed by capitalist industry migrated to the Americas and other settler colonies or were mobilized as soldiers in the endless European wars or died in epidemics and famines. None of these avenues are available today. Hence, postcolonial capitalism, by carrying out primitive accumulation, creates a massive dispossessed population that is redundant to the capitalist growth economy but that must be kept alive. This is done by state-mediated policies that transfer a part of the profits of the growth economy to social expenditures aimed at reversing the effects of primitive accumulation. The result is not a preservation of the traditional subsistence economy, but a new outside of capital. This is commonly referred to as the informal economy which is a creature of capitalist growth. A principal problem in postcolonial countries is the political management of the informal sector. The question now is whether primitive accumulation is better managed under democratic or authoritarian political regimes.

Who is Dr. Partha Chatterjee?

Dr. Partha Chatterjee is a political theorist and historian. He divides his time between Columbia University and the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, where he was the Director from 1997 to 2007. He is a founding member of the Subaltern Studies Collective, an endeavor in historically and critically informed social science scholarship that has been one of the most innovative and influential of its times. He is the author of more than twenty books, monographs and edited volumes and was awarded the Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize for 2009 for outstanding achievements in the field of Asian studies.

His most influential books include The Nation and Its Fragments: Colonial and Postcolonial Histories (1993), a seminal contribution the literature on nationalism, and The Politics of the Governed: Considerations on Political Society in Most of the World (2004), a seminal theoretical statement on the practice of democracy in the global south.
Keynote Speaker #2 Patricia Steinhoff
"Japanese Social Movements: Alternative Democracy Confronts the Same Old State."

Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only). Image

Who is Dr. Patricia Steinhoff?

Dr. Patricia Steinhoff is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Hawaii, Manoa. She is a leading scholar of Japan's social movements. She has conducted extensive research on the Japanese left, particularly in the Japanese protest cycle of the late 1960s and early 1970s, and radical left groups that emerged in that protest cycle and went underground. The author of numerous books and articles, her latest edited volume, Going to Court to Change Japan: Social Movements and the Law, is forthcming from the University of Michigan Center for Japanese monograph series. She has also served many leadership positions in the broader Japanese studies community, including chairing the Northeast Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies, the Editorial and Advisory Boards of the Journal of Japanese Studies, the Japan Advisory Council of the Social Science Research Council, the American Advisory Committee for the Japan Foundation, and as a commissioner on the Japan-US Friendship Commission.
Keynote Speaker #3 Peter Evans
"Reading Polanyi in the Late Neoliberal Era: A Critically Optimistic Perspective."

Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).

Image


Who is Dr. Peter Evans?

Dr. Peter B. Evans, senior fellow at the Watson Institute Brown University, is also professor emeritus in sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Evans is one of the leading figures in the sociology of development, having in particular been at the forefront of theories of the developmental state. Author of many influential books, Dr. Evans' Embedded autonomy: states and industrial transformation (1995) is the classic comparative study of the developmental state in the Global South. He has also authored a range of highly influential articles on theories of comparative development, development policies, the relationship of states to class actors, the dynamics of state-society relations, globalization and labor. Most recently Dr. Evans has explored the role of the “21 Century developmental state” synthesizing new developments in economic theories of growth with his own work on the political foundations of effective states.

Dr. Evans serves on the board of the United Nations Research Institute for Social Development and as an advisory group member of the Effective States and Inclusive Development Research Centre-Consortium of the Institute for Policy Development and Management, the University of Manchester, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.
Discussants Patrick Heller (Brown University)
Francesca Polletta (University of California, Irvine)
Keiichi Tsunekawa (National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Japan)
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free (No prior registration is necessary).
Venue Ito Hall, Ito International Research Center
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Reception: Meet Our Keynote Speakers and about 20 Invited Scholars!

Date July 20, Sunday
Time 18:00-20:30
Event RECEPTION

You will have an opportunity to meet about twenty guest scholars (sociologists, political scientists, anthropologist, and social psychologist) specializing in globalization, democracy and democratization, development, labor studies, social movements and contentious politics, civil society, social psychology, subaltern studies, transnationalism, gender, demography, revolution, political violence and terrorism, and more!

Our guests (subject to change)
Rina Agarwala, Edwin Amenta, Moises Arce, Salvatore Babones, Partha Chatterjee, Nitsan Chorev, Peter Evans, Helena Flam, Eli Friedman, Manuel A. Garretón, Jeff Goodwin, Patrick Heller, Bert Klandermans, Guadalupe Olivier, Tola Olu Pearce, Geoffrey Pleyers, Francesca Polletta, Gay Seidman, Patricia Steinhoff, Sergio Tamayo, Keiichi Tsunekawa, and Kim Voss.
Fee 5,000 yen (3,000 yen for the first 50 registrants)
3,000 yen for students.
Prior registration is recommended. Click here to register.
Venue Event Space, Ito International Research Center
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)


July 21 (Monday)


Workshop #3: Rina Agarwala

Date July 21, Monday
Time 09:00-10:20
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Rina Agarwala (John Hopkins University)
"Remaking the Working Class in the 21st Century: Informal Workers’ Struggles in 8 Countries"

Image
Discussants Yoojin Koo (The University of Tokyo)
Tola Olu Pearce (University of Missouri, Columbia)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Conference Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #4: Bert Klandermans

Date July 21, Monday
Time 10:40-12:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Bert Klandermans (VU-University)
"We are the people! Confronting the austerity state"
(coauthored with Jacquelien van Stekelenburg, Marie-Louise Damen, Anouk van Leeuwen & Dunya van Troost).

Image Over the last decades we have witnessed a dramatic rise in the occurrence of street demonstrations. Increasingly, citizens take to the street as a mean to communicate their indignation, anger, or worry about the performance of their politicians. "We are the people!" or more recently "We are the 99%!" are appeals to politicians to listen to the people and to take their claims serious. We are the people that you—politicians—say to represent, but we don’t feel represented, we don’t feel listened to.

The financial crisis only amplified the outrage. People lament that rather than protecting them from the economic recession politicians are shifting the burden of the crisis to the people. But, the people say no to the emaciated, austerity state (Offe 2013), they don’t want to pay for the failures of capitalism.

Yet, people differ in the way they respond. Quite a few don’t respond altogether, but we see those who do respond taking diverging routes. Some participate in demonstrations against specific austerity measures that affect them personally. For instance, students protesting a raise of tuition fees or public health workers fighting budget cuts on health care—we call that Anti-Austerity demonstrations (AA-Demonstrations). Others take part in demonstrations against the powers taking these measures; laying charges against the political mismanagement of the crisis and calling the government’s legitimacy into question. People challenge democracy as it is done. Claiming that the power should be taken from corrupt and incompetent politicians and given to the people—Occupy-London or Amsterdam, or May 15 in Spain are examples. We call that Pro-Democracy Demonstrations (PD-Demonstrations).

How are the two types of demonstrations different? Are the dynamics of demand, supply and mobilization diverging? Do they bring different people into the streets and squares? It has been argued that the two are fundamentally different, appealing to different motives, employing disparate mobilization mechanisms, and revealing diverging processes. Is that so? So far, there is very little data to support or refute that claim. Questions like these require comparative studies of the two types of demonstrations. Most of the research of protest events, however, are either single cases studies that are not comparative by design, or global surveys that fall short of data regarding individual demonstrations, or protest event studies that do not produce data regarding individual demonstrators.

But, we are fortunate to dispose of a dataset of over 15.000 individuals participating in a variety of street demonstration that make it possible to answer such questions. Caught in the Act of Protest: Contextualizing Contestation was designed precisely to solve such comparative puzzles. Between 2009 and 2013 we surveyed the citizens who populated street demonstrations in eight European countries—building a unique dataset of over 80 demonstrations. Some were ritual parades such as gay-prides, women’s marches, or 1st of May parades. Other were typical new social movements events addressing such issues nuclear energy, fascism, peace or racism. Again other were AA- or PD-demonstrations protesting the austerity politics in their country. We will compare the participants in the latter two types of demonstrations. How were they different in terms of gender, age, education and employment status? Were they socially and politically embedded in different ways? Are they differentially mobilized? Does their evaluation of how democracy is done in their country diverge? Do they differ in terms of the extent to which they trust state institutions? Did their motivation to participate diverge? These are the questions we seek to answer.
Discussants Moises Arce (The University of Tokyo & University of Missouri, Columbia)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Conference Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #5: Jeff Goodwin

Date July 21, Monday
Time 13:20-14:40
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Jeff Goodwin (New York University)
"The New Anti-Capitalist Movements: Occupy and 15M in Comparative Perspective"
(coauthored with Eduardo Romanos).

Image This paper addresses whether we are seeing new strategies and tactics - - and new forms of organization - - by movements against capitalism and corporate power. The paper also asks whether we are seeing new kinds of social subjects and new solidarities. Also, what kind of power can these new movements leverage? What have they achieved and what might they achieve?
Discussants Eli Friedman (Cornell University)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Seminar Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #6: Geoffrey Pleyers

Date July 21, Monday
Time 15:00-16:20
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Geoffrey Pleyers (Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium)
"Alter-Europe: Progressive activists and models of democracy in the aftermath of the crisis."


Image
Discussants Yu Nobuoka (The University of Tokyo)
Salvatore Babones (The University of Sydney)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Seminar Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #7: Francesca Polletta

Date July 21, Monday
Time 16:40-18:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Francesca Polletta (University of California, Irvine)
"Social Movements in an Age of Participation"


Image Social movements operate today amidst a remarkable enthusiasm for citizen participation. From participatory budgeting to Wikipedia, flat management to horizontalist protest politics, there is a new confidence in the ability of ordinary people to make the decisions that matter. In this paper, I compare our current participatory moment with an earlier one, in the 1960s. What opportunities and challenges does the new participatory landscape present for social movements, and in particular, for participatory democratic movement groups? By the latter, I mean both movement groups that seek to gain a voice for people traditionally excluded from policymaking and groups that also seek to enact within their own operation the values of equality and freedom that they hope to bring about in the larger world.

With respect to the first, I focus on opportunities and challenges presented by the government-sponsored citizen forums that have proliferated in the last fifteen years. Critics have seen such forums as neoliberal strategies designed to give people voice in lieu of power. I argue that that characterization overshoots the mark. It misses the fact that activists can use the symbolic power of the “people’s voice” to challenge policies promoted by those in power rather than simply rubberstamp them. However, taking advantage of the opportunities created by participatory forums requires an ability to operate from both within and outside the participatory process. That in turn, requires a kind of tactical flexibility that is often unfamiliar to activists.

When it comes to movement groups that also seek to operate as participatory democracies (e.g. Occupy, groups in the alterglobalization movement), I argue that there are elements of the early 1960s participatory democratic project that may be worth recovering. Activists in the southern civil rights movement used participatory democratic movement practices on local projects as a way to train people with little experience in how to do politics—but also in how to figure out their own interests and what should count as leadership. That pedagogical rationale for participation has lost favor in movement circles, and operationalizing it in a way that combines learning with equality presents challenges. But it offers the potential to make participatory democracy appealing to people outside small networks of middle class activists.
Discussants Shunsuke Fujita (The University of Tokyo)
Helena Flam (University of Leipzig, Germany)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Seminar Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor IHS logo (color) Integrated Human Sciences Program for Cultural Diversity (IHS)
The University of Tokyo
(external link)




Image Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


July 22 (Tuesday)


Workshop #8: Salvatore Babones

Date July 22, Tuesday
Time 09:00-10:20
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Salvatore Babones (The University of Sydney)
"From Monitory Democracy to Monitory Empire."


Image This will be a wholly new paper that applies my current writing on the transition to American empire to John Keene's concept of monitory democracy. Keene sees monitory democracy as the third stage of democracy (following direct and representative democracy). The defining characteristic of monitory democracy is that our experience of democratic governance is intermediated by civil society organizations. The most relevant conference themes and questions for my paper are:

Theme B: States and Social Movements
• Under what conditions do movements gain political influence?
• How do these patterns alter our understanding of state-related influences or "political opportunities" on movements?

Theme F: New Understandings of Democracy
• What does democracy mean in a globalizing world?
• Development agencies and governments promote new forms of civic participation; how should we assess just how democratic such forms are?
Discussants Hiromi Makita (The University of Tokyo)
Nitsan Chorev (Brown University)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Seminar Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor Image
JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

Image
Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image
Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #9: Sergio Tamayo and Guadalupe Olivier

Date July 22, Tuesday
Time 10:40-12:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation Sergio Tamayo (Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana, Mexico) and
Guadalupe Olivier (National University of Education Sciences, Mexico)
"The mobilization-demobilization process of the student movement in the difficult construction of a democratic future. The case of Mexican "#Yosoy132" movement."


Image Image

The purpose of this paper is to stand out what we believe are the main tensions of the student movement so called “#YoSoy132”. This mobilisation emerged following the presidential race of 2012 in Mexico. We observe that several aspects of the political context along the class conditions of the participants, as well as some mechanisms of mobilization-demobilization, brought the movement to an end point of no return.

At first, we describe those mobilisations worldwide to locate more precisely the experience of #YoSoy132 movement. We highlight here two aspects in common: the struggle for democracy, and the internal use of international networks. Then we expose the political context for 2012 presidential elections that brought back the former hegemonic political party after 12 years of absence.

After these two elements of context, we introduce some explanations about the unsolved political tension inside the #YoSoy132. These tensions can explain the process of transformation and disintegration, as well as the cycles of decline and demobilization that brought the movement to change its purpose and its final breakdown. It is essential for us to bring to the front of the analysis, the trajectories and practices of both private and public Universities in the whole country, intimately related to students’ class formation. This allows establishing the existing political contradictions, based on the movement plurality. Finally, in order to explain the path of contestation, we enhance four basic elements of mobilisation-demobilisation: a) The political nature of the movement, b) The role of the alliances and rival networks as well as the internal struggle for hegemony, c) The definition and innovation of the repertoire of mobilization, and d) Repression mechanisms.
Discussants Yukiko Nagata (The University of Tokyo)
Yoshiyuki Aoki (The University of Tokyo)
Edwin Amenta (The University of Tokyo & University of California, Irvine)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Ito International Research Center (IIRC) Seminar Room
The University of Tokyo, Hongo Campus
(external link)
Sponsor Image
JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

Image
Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image
Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)




The Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University

Image


July 23 (Wednesday)


Workshop #10: Nitsan Chorev

Date July 23, Wednesday
Time 09:00-10:20
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation Nitsan Chorev (Brown University)
"The diminishing returns of transnational disputes: the case of intellectual property rights in Kenya."


Image
Discussants Saori Ohki (The University of Tokyo)
Gay Seidman (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Main Conference Room, 3rd floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University(external link)
Sponsor Image

Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University(external link)

Image

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

  Image

Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image

Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #11: James Jasper

Date July 23, Wednesday
Time 10:20-12:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation James Jasper (City University of New York)
"Social Movements and the Rise of Compassionate Democracy"


Image
Discussants Geoffrey Pleyers (Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Main Conference Room, 3rd floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University(external link)
Sponsor Image

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

  Image

Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University(external link)

Image

Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image

Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)





July 24 (Thursday)


Workshop #12: Moises Arce

Date July 24, Thursday
Time 13:00-14:20
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Moises Arce (University of Missouri, Columbia)
"Social Mobilization and Resource-Based Growth in Peru."


Image The extraction of natural resources in Peru has led to an impressive economic expansion, but the country has also had more than its share of protests against resource extraction. The conventional wisdom on mobilizations against extraction emphasizes their geographical dispersion throughout the country, the presence of weak protest movement organizations, and ultimately, their low influence on national outcomes. Following contributions from the literature on social movements, in particular, those of political process theory, I explain the conditions under which localized, geographically dispersed protest movements are likely to stimulate positive responses on behalf of aggrieved groups. I also identify the types of mobilizations against extraction that are more likely to lead to organized and sustained challenges, and in the long run, more likely to affect national outcomes. A comparative analysis of several protests over extraction in Peru reveals significant national policy effects and highlights the salience of collective actors on the trajectory of the state’s economy. Insofar as the extraction of natural resources is pivotal to a country’s political economy, the political consequences of mobilizations over extraction in Peru have important ramifications for similar resource-based growth policies elsewhere in the developing world.
Discussants Kota Miura (The University of Tokyo)
Isamu Okada (Kyoto University)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Main Conference Room, 3rd floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University(external link)
Sponsor Image

Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University(external link)

Image

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

  Image

Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image

Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #13: Patrick Heller

Date July 24, Thursday
Time 14:40-16:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation
Patrick Heller (Brown University)
"Democratic Deepening in the Age of Neo-liberalism: Comparing Brazil, India and South Africa"


Image
This paper argues that democratic deepening in the age of neo-liberalism is not overdetermined by globalization. Rather, it is shaped by shifting civil society-state relations that can only be understood by disaggregating democratic deepening into its component parts of participation, representation and stateness. This frame is used to explore the divergent democratic trajectories of Brazil, India and South Africa (BISA). Through the examples of local government transformation and social movement mobilization, I argue that a “project” civil society in Brazil has deepened democracy and transformed the state. In contrast, in South Africa and India civil society is increasingly being subordinated to political society. In South Africa, an active civil society has largely been sidelined as a politically consequential actor (containerization) and in India much of civil society has been fragmented and instrumentalized (involution).
Discussants Partha Chatterjee (Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, India & Columbia University)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Main Conference Room, 3rd floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University(external link)
Sponsor Image

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

  Image

Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University(external link)

Image

Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image

Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Extra Session: Takeshi Wada

Date July 24, Thursday
Time 16:10-17:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation
Takeshi Wada (The University of Tokyo)
"Predicting Future Action Patterns Based on the Cultural Hypothesis about Repertoires of Contention"
(coauthored with Yoojin Koo and Kayo Hoshino).

Image
Contentious events—such as the collapses of socialist regimes around 1990, the Seattle anti-globalization protests in 1999, and the Arab Spring since 2010—often catch many by surprise. It appears that future contentious events are totally unpredictable. The literature of repertoires of contention, however, suggests that future actions by contentious actors are highly predictable because actors’ selection of action forms is dependent upon their familiarity with these forms. In a word, people cannot perform if they do not know how.
This paper explores such a cultural hypothesis about repertoires and asks to what degree we can predict future action patterns (violence, nonviolent protests, and conventional institutional actions). Specifically, we examine what is the most important predictor of action patterns: (1) institutional regime characteristics such as degree of democracy and state capacity, as political process theorists have argued, or (2) actors’ familiarity with contentious forms, as the cultural hypothesis claims?
To find an answer to the question, we conduct a cross-national comparison of action patterns using a data set of 10 million events world-wide, reported by Reuters, between 1990 and 2004. Using multilevel analysis, we estimate and compare the national-level effects of structural-institutional characteristics (e.g., regime characteristics, levels of development) and the actor-specific effect of cultural factor (actors’ familiarity with specific forms of contention, measured by action patterns in the past years). We also uncover the conditions under which new innovations of action patterns are likely to occur.
This study contributes to the study of contentious politics both theoretically and methodologically by explicitly integrating cultural dimensions—rather than by treating culture as a residual explanatory factor—into the analysis of repertoire selection. While the prediction of future events and actions is difficult and, therefore, is not a popular topic, this study makes an important step toward such a research direction.
Paper Please login to download the PowerPoint (for conference participants only).
Venue Main Conference Room, 3rd floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University(external link)
Sponsor Image

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

  Image

Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University(external link)

Image

Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image

Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)






July 25 (Friday)

Workshop #14: Edwin Amenta

Date July 25, Friday
Time 09:00-10:20
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation
Edwin Amenta (University of California, Irvine)
"U.S. Movements in the Great Depression and Great Recession: Why They Took Off and Why They Were So Different"
(coauthored with Thomas Alan Elliott and Amber Celina Tierney).

Image The Great Depression and Great Recession both brought upsurges of social movement activity in the United States. But the activity and newspaper coverage of movement organizations during the Depression was far more slanted to left-leaning movements than that of the Recession. Through an analysis of the entire social movement sector, as well as specific movements, we argue that these similarities and differences are not due to the economic severity of the crisis. Instead, we focus on the timing of the crisis, the duration of reform-oriented regimes, and the policies pursued by the Roosevelt and Obama administrations. Roosevelt took power after unemployment from the Depression had peaked, his most dominant political alignment in Congress took place two years after his term started and lasted for four years, and he pursued policies in areas where social mobilization was strong. By way of contrast, Obama took office before unemployment peaked, and thus gained significant political ownership of the recession, had a dominant congressional alignment only during his first two years, did not greatly advance policies for which there was movement backing, and advanced policies for which there was not. Once a movement developed to address inequality, he had no congressional backing to pass legislation.
Discussants Kayo Hoshino (The University of Tokyo)
Bert Klandermans (VU-University, Netherlands)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Main Conference Room, 3rd floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University(external link)
Sponsor Image

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

  Image

Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University(external link)

Image

Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image

Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)


Workshop #15: Kim Voss

Date July 25, Friday
Time 10:40-12:00
Event WORKSHOP
Presentation

Kim Voss (University of California, Berkeley)
"Ironies of Neoliberalism: The shifting repertoires of labor contention in the United States-- with some implications for democracy"
(coauthored with Pablo Gaston).

Image
Discussants Jeff Goodwin (New York University)
Paper Please login to download the paper (for conference participants only).
Language English (No simultaneous translation is provided).
Fee Free. Prior registration is required. Click here to register.
Venue Main Conference Room, 3rd floor, Inamori Center, Kyoto University(external link)
Sponsor Image

Center for Integrated Area Studies (CIAS), Kyoto University(external link)

Image

JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26590087
“The Future of Democracy After Neoliberalism: Social Movements in a Globalizing World” (Dr. Takeshi Wada, the University of Tokyo)
(external link)

  Image

Department of Area Studies
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)

Image

Graduate Program on Global Humanities
The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo
(external link)






Post-Conference Sessions

November 11 (Tuesday) - November 21 (Friday)

Graduate Seminar: Edwin Amenta

Date November 11 (Tuesday) ~ November 21 (Friday)
Time TBA
Event INTENSIVE GRADUATE SEMINAR
"Research on the Consequences of Social Movements"
Instructor
Edwin Amenta (The University of Tokyo & University of California, Irvine)
Course Description Image This course surveys theories and research on the political and other macro-social consequences of social movements. We will address questions surrounding how to think about these consequences and how to analyze them. Aside from the political consequences of movements, we will also address related macro-social consequences of movements, including macro cultural ones, treating the news media as partly a political institution, and the influence of movements on businesses. The class addresses literature on social movements, social policy, democratization, the news media, and corporations. Although the concepts and theories can be employed in many settings, the course focuses on the United States in comparative and historical perspective.
Keywords Social movements, political sociology, social policy, culture, news media
Course Syllabus [|Click here to download the syllabus (unavailable).]
Language English
Venue Room (TBA)
The University of Tokyo, Komaba Campus
(external link)